Brad Sherman Named to Investopedia Most Influential Advisors

One of the core reasons I started the company was because financial literacy and empowerment was lacking in the US education system and big firms made you believe unless you had a lot of investable assets, finding conflict-free financial advice was impossible. Investopedia is a fantastic website full of educational resources and we are honored to be included in their top 100 list of financial advisors who are breaking barriers and pushing the ball forward in terms of financial literacy and empowerment of financial education. Honored to be on the list among other great advisors, peers, and friends.

The Investopedia 100 celebrates financial advisors who are making significant contributions to critical conversations about financial literacy, investing strategies, life-stage planning and wealth management. With more than 100,000 independent financial advisors in the U.S., the Investopedia 100 spotlights the country’s most engaged, influential, and educational advisors. Brad Sherman has been named to this list for the third year in a row.

About Investopedia

Investopedia is the world’s leading source of financial content on the web. They help investors understand financial concepts, improve investing skills, and learn how to manage their money.

Disclaimers

Investopedia’s proprietary methodology focuses on awarding financial advisors who have demonstrated a top-of-the-industry ability to reach the largest and most diverse financial and investing audience. That reach is measured by the impact and quality of the advisor’s published work, public appearances, online following, and commitment to financial literacy across diverse communities. The 2020 Investopedia 100 also heavily weighed peer-to-peer nominations, highlighting the most influential advisors who were recommended by their peers. We receive no compensation from placing advisors on our list, nor does an advisor’s appearance on our list constitute an individual endorsement by Investopedia of such advisor. 

Awards, third-party rankings and other recognitions are not indicative of future performance. Awards and other recognitions should not be interpreted as a guarantee or suggestion that a client or prospective client will experience a certain level of results if our firm is engaged, or continues to be engaged, to provide investment advisory services, or as an endorsement of our firm by any past or present client. Neither Investopedia nor any of its associates are affiliated with Plancorp, none of the awards or other recognitions are based on client evaluations of our firm, and we have not made any payments for or in anticipation of any award or other recognition. 

How A Presidential Election Affects the Stock Market

During every major election period, there is always talk about the impact that the person winning the White House will have on the stock market. As Americans prepare to elect a president in the coming week, many investors attempt to figure out what the outcome will mean for your portfolio. However, it’s not just as simple as which party wins.  

A look back at history shows that presidential election cycles do correlate with stock market returns, but there are a few things to consider in election years. Bear markets, recessions and wars tend to start in the first two years of a president’s term, says The Stock Trader’s Almanac; bull markets and prosperous times mark the latter half. But over the past century, the stock market has mostly run briskly across most of the presidential cycle before losing momentum during election years.

Democrat or Republican?

Even though you might feel strongly about one party or the other when it comes to your politics, when it relates to your portfolio, it doesn’t matter much which party wins the White House.

According to Bespoke Research, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has gained 4.8% annually since 1900. There are many who would suggest that Republicans, who are supposedly more business-friendly than the Democrats, would be more beneficial for your stock holdings, but that’s not entirely the case. In actuality, the average Republican administration saw gains of 3.5% per year, while the Democrats saw gains of almost twice as much, at 6.7% per year.

Divided vs. United Government:

Another myth is that markets do better when the government is divided. This theory derives from the idea that divided power saves both parties from their worst instincts. With neither party in control, government is somewhat neutral, leaving markets free to flourish. However, this hasn’t always been the case either.  

Y Charts has looked at stock returns going back to 1930 under three separate scenarios. When one party controls the White House and both houses of Congress, the Dow averages 10.7% annual returns. When there’s a split Congress, stocks average 9.1% returns. But when the president is in the party opposite of both the House and Senate, stocks deliver a mere 7% average annual return. Consider this breakdown of scenario by party, using S&P 500 data from RBC CapitalMarkets data going back to 1933:

It is important to remember that all of this information is looking at the performance of the broader stock market. Presidential elections can and will continue to have more specific consequences for the market, depending on each party’s agenda and how much of Washington they control.

Predicting the Future:

It turns out that the stock market has a remarkable ability to predict who will likely win the White House. If the stock market is up in the three months leading up to the election, the incumbent party is more often the winner. Losses over those three months tend to elect the opposing party.

With the final stretch of the election upon us, it’s still nearly impossible to guess how the stock market will react to next week’s vote. Our firm recommends that no one should make investment decisions based on the outcome of an election. Regardless of who wins the election, expect a continued economic rebound that will support future equity gains. In similarly polarizing elections in 2008 and 2016, investors who maintained their stock allocations were rewarded with future gains, so it’s best to avoid making any major moves with your portfolio over the next few months. If you have any questions relating to the stock market and your financial goals, please contact us and we would be happy to help you set up your portfolio respectively. 

 

Why Now May Be a Good Time to Consider a Roth IRA Conversion

The coronavirus pandemic and the upcoming election has created a great deal of uncertainty for investors. Income tax, furloughs, and job loss are lingering over the heads of many. As people are navigating these unprecedented times, they are becoming more and more unsure about where to and how much to invest. But it’s important to keep in mind that regardless of uncertainty in the market, it’s always a good time to invest for your future. 

The recent stock market meltdown may have dented Americans’ retirement savings, but there’s a silver lining: The downturn made one common retirement strategy less costly for investors.

The strategy, known as a Roth IRA conversion, involves changing a traditional, pre-tax retirement account — such as a 401(k) plan or a qualified individual retirement account — to an after-tax Roth fund. This strategy has some unique benefits when compared with its traditional cousin.

To do the conversion, savers would opt to pay income tax now, while markets are down and tax rates are lower under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Investors who own traditional accounts defer income tax on their savings until withdrawing the money in retirement. Roth savers pay tax up front and don’t pay later. Having at least some Roth funds is beneficial for a few reasons, according to financial advisors. Retirees don’t have to take mandatory withdrawals from Roth accounts, unlike traditional IRA investors, who have to beginning at age 72. Taking Roth distributions could also decrease Social Security taxes and Medicare premiums, which are pegged to one’s taxable income.

In addition, there’s the benefit of tax diversification. Like the concept of investment diversification, tax diversification is important because it reduces the risk associated with unknown future tax rates, advisors said. Data suggest investors aren’t greatly diversifying their retirement accounts from a tax standpoint.

Traditional IRAs held around $7.5 trillion at the end of 2018 — almost 10 times as much as Roth accounts, which had $800 billion, according to the Investment Company Institute. Ultimately, investors should peg a conversion primarily to tax rates — if savers believe their tax rate is lower now than it will be in retirement, a conversion makes sense because it will cost less in the long run, according to tax experts. And, contrary to popular opinion, one’s tax rate doesn’t always fall in retirement, they said.

Tax rates are currently low by historical standards and are likely to increase (rather than fall further) in the future, experts said, given the eventual need to raise federal revenue to reduce the U.S. budget deficit, which is larger as a share of its economy than most other developed countries.

If you are considering a Roth IRA Conversion, please consult with your financial advisor  and your EA/CPA or tax preparer to ensure that this decision is the best for your financial situation. If you would like to discuss the potential of a Roth Conversion, please reach out to us and schedule a free 30-minute consultation

 

How Much Retirement Savings Is Enough? Why Couples May Disagree

As couples combine their finances and think about their financial future, its common for the conversation to be uncomfortable or tricky. While one individual in the relationship might think about money one way, the other party could think about it completely different. Just know, it’s normal and okay to have different background and approaches to money, but that communication is key in coming to a solid compromise and understanding. 

The first step is communication. When discussing your finances, it’s important to communicate and feel open about discussing an often uncomfortable topic such as money. 

The Wall Street Journal highlighted an issue that can get overlooked in retirement planning: the financial burdens that women, in particular, face late in life.

A survey last year by the National Council on Aging and Ipsos, a polling and data firm, found that fully half (51%) of women age 60 and older are worried about outliving their savings. In the same survey, almost six in 10 women (59%) said they are worried about losing their independence.

According to the survey, women, of course, typically live longer than men—about five years, on average—and are more likely to live their final years alone. In 2019, almost half (44%) of women age 75 and older in the U.S. lived alone, according to the Administration on Aging. 

As you can see from the survey data reference above, both men and women often have different expectations on how much money they need for their future, which is normal. Again, make sure to communicate and research with your partner to insure both individuals are comfortable with their finances and savings. Of course, a good financial adviser also can make a difference. But the most important step is to talk about retirement and how your finances might play out before you get there. If you have any questions, or want to discuss retirement with us, please schedule a complimentary 30-minute consultation.

 

These are your 2021 401(k) and IRA Contribution Limits

The IRS released annual inflation adjustments for 2021 for many tax provisions on Monday, including new income tax brackets and an increased standard deduction. It also announced that contribution limits for 401(k)s and IRAs will not increase next year. 

What Changed?

The following limits are going up for 2021:

  • The annual additions limit for defined contribution plans increases to $58,000
  • The annual compensation limit increases to $290,000
  • The Social Security Wage Base increases to $142,800

The following limits will remain the same next year: 

  • The salary deferral limit for 401(k), 403(b) and 457 plans remains at $19,500
  • The SIMPLE deferral limit remains at $13,500
  • The catch-up contribution limits for 401(k) plans and SIMPLE IRAs remain the same $6,500 and $3,000 respectively
  • The annual additions limit for defined benefit plans remains at $230,000
  • The compensation limit for determining who is a highly compensated employee will remain the same at $130,000

For more 2021 cost-of-living adjustments and 401(k) limits, visit the IRS’s bulletin. If you have any questions, please reach out to us at info@shermanwealth.com or check out our other blogs for more information on 401(k)’s. 

 

Small Businesses Agonize Over PPP Loan Forgiveness

The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP loan) pumped $525 billion in forgivable loans to small businesses from early April through early August. The program has been praised for saving jobs and buoying struggling businesses but criticized for its clumsy rollout, fraud, and for favoring companies with established banking relationships over underbanked ventures. 

In a recent report, the Government Accountability Office urged the Small Business Administration to identify and respond to multiple PPP risks among other recommendations for other agencies to improve the government’s response to the pandemic.

One reason the PPP was so attractive to borrowers was the potential to turn loans into grants. For that to happen, each borrower needed to complete a forgiveness application and submit it to their lender, who would work with them to make it stronger. In a study reported by Politico on September 19th, the agency had received “96,000 forgiveness applications– representing fewer than 2 percent of the total loans– but has not approved or denied any of them.” 

Because of the PPP’s changing rules, there’s confusion around the forgiveness process, says Brian Pifer, vice president of entrepreneurship at advocacy group Small Business Majority, which has about 65,000 members in its network. Multiple trade groups are supporting two bipartisan bills that would forgive PPP loans under $150,000 once the borrower completes a one-page form, according to the American Bankers Association. There’s also broad support to relaunch PPP, though the Brookings Institution is suggesting tax credits would be more effective, Bloomberg News reported

What should a business owner keep in mind about the forgiveness process?  We spoke to Chris Levy, a senior vice president at Pursuit, a community development financial institution which has funded over 7,000 PPP loans totaling nearly $500 million to businesses in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Its median loan size was about $20,000. Levy says his institution got money to “the smallest of the small businesses out there–the ones that were really struggling.” 

Levy listed a few pieces of advice for small business owners to keep in mind: 

  1. You Have Some Time. Borrowers understandably are eager to complete the forgiveness application and put the PPP loan behind them, says Levy. You can apply for loan forgiveness as soon as your lender starts accepting forgiveness applications. But you should wait because Congress will likely pass legislation that will make the forgiveness process easier, he says, including automatic forgiveness for PPP loans of $150,000 or less.

While some lenders are accepting applications, Pursuit and many others aren’t yet. “The main reason we’re waiting is because we don’t feel like it’s appropriate not only for us to waste our time but for our borrowers to waste their time going through a super detailed forgiveness application that is only going to get easier,” says Levy. 

  1. Review the rules and basics. You can get loan forgiveness on what you spend on payroll, rent, and other eligible expenses during the so-called covered period—the 24-week period beginning the day you receive the funds from your PPP loan. The rules have changed significantly as PPP has evolved: The minimum amount that must be spent on payroll is 60% (originally it was 75%). You can spend up to 40% on non-payroll costs such as rent, utilities and mortgage interest. The loan maturity is now five years; it used to be two years.

 

Once the 24-week period ends, you have 10 months to submit your forgiveness application to your lender, according to this FAQ from the SBA. You don’t need to make any payments until the SBA makes a decision. If only a portion of the loan is forgiven, or if the forgiveness application is denied, the balance due on the loan must be repaid by the borrower on or before the maturity date of the loan.

 

  1. Chew on this scenario. A business owner who received a PPP loan in April is allowed to wait until December to apply through their lender for forgiveness. The SBA might not make a determination until February. The borrower would not make any payments during that 10-month period. “The deferment period is essentially undefined and will not be defined until the SBA makes a determination,” says Levy. “It allows borrowers more time.”
  2. Stay Calm.  “The one thing we’ve found throughout this whole process—the more patience you have, the better the rules get for you,” says Levy. Keep payroll records as you normally do and communicate regularly with your lender, he says. He urges business owners not to drive themselves crazy. The 3508 EZ form simplifies the rules and should work for almost everyone, Levy says. “It’s really made it that much easier for everyone to obtain full forgiveness. The forgiveness documentation is the same documentation that they had to use when they initially applied, he says. “If they got the loan in the first place, they’ll be able to get forgiveness.

While the coronavirus has put a detrimental strain on many businesses, small businesses have been struggling a great deal. For any small business owners out there, stay calm, educate yourself on the situation and remain positive. The PPP loan has helped so many small businesses stay afloat during this economic crisis. If you have any questions on your small business or its financial situation, we’d be happy to chat. Please reach out to us at info@shermanwealth.com and refer to our other blogs for further resources.

IRS Finalizes ABLE Account Regulations: Here’s What to Know

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The IRS recently published final regulations for Achieving a Better Life Experience, or ABLE, accounts for disabled Americans. ABLE accounts aim to help people with disabilities and their families save and pay for disability-related expenses. Even though the contributions aren’t deductible, distributions such as earnings are tax-free to the designated beneficiary if they’re used to pay for qualified disability expenses. These expenses can include housing, education, transportation, health, prevention and wellness, employment training and support, assistive technology and personal support services, along with other disability-related expenses.

The regulations come in response to and finalize two previously issued proposed regulations from the IRS. The first proposed regulation was published in 2015 after enactment of the ABLE Act under the Obama administration. The second proposed regulation was published in 2019 in response to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which made some major changes to ABLE. 

Eligible individuals can now put more money into their ABLE account and roll money from their qualified tuition programs (529 plans) into their ABLE accounts. In addition, some contributions made to ABLE accounts by low- and moderate-income workers can now qualify for the Saver’s Credit.

The new regulations also offer guidance on the gift and generation-skipping transfer tax consequences of contributions to an ABLE account, as well as on the federal income, gift, and estate tax consequences of distributions from, and changes in the designated beneficiary of, an ABLE account.

In addition, before Jan. 1, 2026, funds can be rolled over from a designated beneficiary’s section 529 plan to an ABLE account for the same beneficiary or a family member. The regulations provide that rollovers from 529 plans, along with any contributions made to the designated beneficiary’s ABLE account (other than certain permitted contributions of the designated beneficiary’s compensation) can’t exceed the annual ABLE contribution limit.

Lastly, the final regulations offer guidance on the record-keeping and reporting requirements of a qualified ABLE program. A qualified ABLE program must maintain records that enable the program to account to the Secretary with respect to all contributions, distributions, returns of excess contributions or additional accounts, income earned, and account balances for any designated beneficiary’s ABLE account. In addition, a qualified ABLE program must report to the Secretary the establishment of each ABLE account, including the name, address, and TIN of the designated beneficiary, information regarding the disability certification or other basis for eligibility of the designated beneficiary, and other relevant information regarding each account. 

For more information about ABLE accounts or if you have any questions regarding these regulatory changes, please contact us at info@shermanwealth.com or check out our other relevant blogs

What to Do If You Don’t Have a 401(k)

Piggybank on wooden table with stacks of coins beside it. A hand putting a coin into the piggy bank.

As the coronavirus sweeps the world and people take a step back to look at their financial picture, they are realizing that they do not have a company 401(K). 

Even though some of these people work at a company where they offer a 401(k), they may not be eligible due to not meeting criteria, such as length of employment, or they are not a full-time employee.

So, as people are stressing more about the importance of having a hefty savings account, it’s a great time to discuss options for individuals who are not eligible for their company 401(k) or do not have one through their workplace.  Below we will share several options for people in this situation according to an article by MorningStar.

1) Invest in an IRA.

A good first step for someone without a 401(k) is setting up an IRA. An IRA is a great other step to save for retirement and seek tax benefits. You are eligible to contribute $6,000 a year to your IRA.

2) Look Into Self-employment accounts are an option.

For self-employed individuals, there are several options to consider. Some of them are similar to 401(k)s but are just set up a bit differently. Speak with a financial professional to see what options you can set up for yourself. 

3) Consider an HSA 

If you have a high-deductible health care plan you can consider setting up an HSA in order to save some of those dollars and grow your money tax deferred. 

4) Open a Taxable brokerage account.

While its always nice to grow your money tax deferred, investing in a regular taxable account is always a great option. You can speak with a tax professional to see how to do so in a tax efficient manner. 

5) Be part of the solution.

Lastly, if you work for a small employer without a 401(k), maybe ask them to see if it’s something they are interested in starting. Never hurts to ask! 

As always, if you have any questions about your current 401(k) or need help investing money in order to supplement a lack of one, please reach out to us and we would be happy to discuss your future financial goals.  

Money Mistakes You Might Make in a Recession

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It’s very common to make mistakes when it comes to your finances and managing your money. We read a Wall Street Journal article discussing the biggest money mistakes people tend to make during an economic downturn and we want to bring light to a few of them and talk about ways to avoid them.

By reading and addressing financial mistakes people make, hopefully you can avoid them in the future. Below we will discuss some common financial mistakes people often times make. 

  • Refusing to Tap the Emergency Fund
  • Avoiding Credit Score
  • Avoiding Savings For Retirement
  • Ignoring Money Conversations

As mentioned above, an economic recession is the perfect opportunity to take a step back and discuss and organize your finances. Saving for the future, talking to someone about your investments, and organizing your portfolio are all smart moves when setting yourself up for financial success and the ability to navigate an economic recession. If you have any questions or want to talk about your personal finances, please reach out to us at info@shermanwealth.com. To read some of our other blogs, check it out here

Top 5 Pieces of Financial Advice

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As we are all adjusting to the new norm that the coronavirus pandemic has created in our world, we are also learning pieces of advice that we could share from this experience. When going through an economic crisis, it’s important to keep some tips at top-of-mind to help you navigate the bumpy waters. In a CNBC Select Article, we found 5 great pieces of financial advice that we want to share with you to put in your financial repertoire.

First and foremost, try not to accumulate credit card debt. Racking up credit card debt can have very negative long term consequences, so it’s important that you pay the full balance on time. When you do not pay the full balance on time, your card will quickly accumulate interest, which often can get so high that it’s hard to pay off. 

According to recent Federal Reserve data released in September, the average interest rate for all credit card accounts is 14.87%. Among accounts assessed interest, or accounts with outstanding finance charges, the average interest rate rises to 16.88%. But for consumers with credit scores below 670, interest rates can near 30%, CNBC Select reports.

Next, make sure you don’t buy things you can’t afford. Although this one seems obvious, it’s much more common than you think. Avoid overspending and spending on things you can live without. Start putting that extra money into savings accounts where you can be accruing interest and earning money. 

Third, invest the year’s expenses or anything saved after you have the year’s expenses saved? Before the pandemic, many people were saying how you should have several months of rent and expenses in a savings account for a rainy day, but as we have seen the economic hardships the coronavirus has inflicted upon our society, we are suggesting to save about a year’s worth of expenses before investing it elsewhere. 

Fourth, start to think like a savvy businessman or woman. Learn to negotiate. Especially in the world we are living in today, make sure you are constantly looking for deals and inquiring about credit card versus cash options. Oftentimes, places will charge you less if you pay in cash. So, before swiping that card, make sure you think about all your options. 

Lastly, buy in bulk. With Amazon becoming increasingly popular and making it possible to get what you need in a matter of hours, take advantage of deals and places you can buy in bulk. If you can save a few dollars here and there, take advantage of it. It’s important to be a smart shopper, especially when buying something pricey, such as groceries for a large family. 

By implementing some of these basic money management tips into your daily routine, you will find yourself becoming a more savvy shopper and saving more money. It is especially important during an economic recession to take these concepts into consideration and make the most of your finances. If you have any questions on other ways you can maximize your financial portfolio and find places in your budget where you can save money, please reach out to us at info@shermanwealth.com or visit our site at www.shermanwealth.com. Check out our other blog posts for more financial advice and tips!